Friday, March 28, 2014

"Crazy" Super Special

The last issue of Crazy would be the "Spring Super Special" published in 1980. It was an epic issue that demonstrated that this publication was finally coming into its own. Auman had mastered the genre and it would be time to move on to other things.












Saturday, March 22, 2014

The Pages of "Crazy Fun"

Check out the Crazy Super Special!







Monday, March 17, 2014

A Portrait of the Artist as a (Very) Young Man: Crazy Magazine

The Literature of Christopher P. Auman 
by James Would, Famous "Literary" Critic

Auman got out of the newspaper game after sales of Neighborhood News stagnated at around two copies sold. He preferred instead to focus on humor and satire in a series of publications that blatantly ripped off Mad Magazine. Crazy was Auman's first attempt which, unbeknownst to him, was the title of an existing, blatant Mad ripoff. To avoid potential law suits, Auman would later alter the title slightly, experimenting with variations like Crazy Games, Crazy Fun, and The Baffling Gazzete (sic).















Check out some pages of Crazy Fun  and the Crazy Super Special!

Monday, February 24, 2014

A Portrait of the Artist as a (Very) Young Man: Neighorhood News

The Literary Journalism of Christopher P. Auman 
by James Would, Famous "Literary" Critic

Tired of the literary scene, as well as the pretentiousness of the art world, Auman left them both behind at the close of the 1970s and focused instead on more journalistic pursuits. Anticipating the hyperlocal movement of early 21st Century journalism, Auman focused solely on the microcosm of the American neighborhood. Neighborhood News was launched in the spring of 1980 and was offered for free to a public hungry for little informational tidbits and whatnot.





Sunday, February 16, 2014

A Portrait of the Artist as a (Very) Young Man: Writers Block

The Literature of Christopher P. Auman by James Would, Famous "Literary" Critic

After his failure as a novelist, Auman made several false starts at a planned series of short stories. Crippled by writer's block and abandoned by his muse, Auman soon found terror in the blank page. The Little Town of Fuzzy Balls would never be populated with Fuzzy Balls, nor would the Talking Crayons utter a single word.